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Categorized | Articles, John E. Marriott

Wild Side – The Right Lens For the Job (preview)

©John E. Marriott Not everyone can afford a big prime. Grizzly bear with a sockeye salmon, Chilcotin Region, BC Gear/Settings: Canon 5D Mark III, Canon EF 500mm f/4 L IS USM lens, ƒ4.5@1/800 sec., ISO 2000

©John E. Marriott
Not everyone can afford a big prime. Grizzly bear with a sockeye salmon, Chilcotin Region, BC
Gear/Settings: Canon 5D Mark III, Canon EF 500mm f/4 L IS USM lens, ƒ4.5@1/800 sec., ISO 2000

Story and photography by John E. Marriott

One of the questions I’m asked the most as a wildlife photographer is: What lenses do you recommend for beginners, intermediates and even advanced photographers as they search for ways to become better at the craft of wildlife photography?

The most obvious answer is that I recommend you own some glorious and ridiculously expensive combo of big, telephoto zooms and primes from Nikon and Canon like the 70-200mm f/2.8, the 300mm f/2.8, the 200-400mm f/4, the 400mm DO f/4, the 500mm f/4, the 600mm f/4 and, of course, the 800mm f/5.6. But for most of us, myself included, it’s not really feasible to carry around (or afford) such a lewd bevy of sexy lenses that would suit any need imaginable.

So for a moment I’m going to assume that if you’re starting out in wildlife photography you don’t have $15K-plus to drop immediately on the flashiest 600mm f/4 monster at your local camera store and instead are considering some more reasonable options to get you started.

To read more of John’s column on choosing the right lens for the job and to read more of this issue please pick up the Summer/Fall 2016 (#38) issue of OPC. Or to never miss an issue please SUBSCRIBE today!

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