Log in | Register

Categorized | Articles, John E. Marriott

Wild Side — Shooting in Extreme Winter Weather (preview)

©John E. Marriott Wild wolf in a blizzard in Banff National Park, AB focused on front legs Gear/Settings: Canon 5D Mark III, 500mm lens, ƒ8@1/640 sec., +1.33 exposure compensation, ISO 1600

©John E. Marriott
Wild wolf in a blizzard in Banff National Park, AB
focused on front legs
Gear/Settings: Canon 5D Mark III, 500mm lens, ƒ8@1/640 sec., +1.33 exposure compensation, ISO 1600

It’s -30 C and snowing — do you know where your camera is? Hopefully it’s on the car seat beside you, in the backpack on your back, or on the tripod in front of you, not stashed away two floors below in your heated garage as you hit snooze for the 11th time.

For some reason (could it be the mind-numbing cold? The gale-force wind? The white-wall of snow?), the worse the weather gets each winter, the fewer of you wildlife photographers I see out and about on the roads and trails, despite the fact that dramatic winter weather provides a boon of wildlife photography opportunities.

Wild wolves on the hunt in raging snowstorms? Check.

Hares hunkered down in howling arctic winds? Check.

Frosty morning moose posing in frigid temperatures? Check.

As silly as it sounds, the key to getting extreme winter weather beauties on your camera is to get out there. And there are a number of different things you should be doing to prepare yourself to avoid getting dangerously cold and/or stuck on some lightly-travelled roadway;

To read more of John E. Marriott’s column and other great how-to articles please pick up the Winter 2015 issue of OPC today, or subscribe! 

 

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.