Log in | Register

Categorized | Articles, Paul Burwell

Digital Chat — The Lying LCD Display and What to do About it (preview)

Digital photographers universally love the instantaneous feedback they can get from looking at their images on the back of the camera. However, did you know that what you see can often be extremely misleading? Keep reading for tips on how to overcome your camera LCD’s tendency to fib.

 

©Paul Burwell Mountain lion pouncing through the snow. The image here looks sharp due to the image's size relative to the viewer. Gear/Settings: Canon 1DX, focal length 210mm, ƒ6.3@1/500 sec., ISO 1250

©Paul Burwell
Mountain lion pouncing through the snow. The image here looks sharp due to the image’s size relative to the viewer.
Gear/Settings: Canon 1DX, focal length 210mm, ƒ6.3@1/500 sec., ISO 1250

©Paul Burwell Image zoomed in to 100 percent on the back of the camera, illustrating how much softer the image actually can be.

©Paul Burwell
Image zoomed in to 100 percent on the back of the camera, illustrating how much softer the image actually can be.

Have you ever been out making photographs and took one you were really happy with? You looked at it on the LCD on the back of your camera and it appeared really sharp and true to colour. Then when you uploaded the image to your computer and viewed it on your big monitor, the photo suddenly appeared not quite sharp and under/overexposed. How did that happen?

To read more of Paul Burwell’s “Digital Chat” column, please pick up the Spring/Summer 2015 issue of OPC today, or subscribe now and never miss an issue!

 

 

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.